Lunch time meditation sessions offer Kiandra a moment to de-stress

Let us face it. We are in an age where 24 hours are not enough. The amount of work ‘to be done’ is at an all-time high and every day we just seem to be catching up. Is there a solution besides energy drinks, caffeine, sleep and probably a vacation to escape this cycle? I think the key is in meditation.

Last month, with the support of our Head of Software, I got the opportunity to introduce lunch time meditation sessions once a week to our company. I have been meditating for the past 16 years and am a qualified instructor and thought I would use this knowledge to benefit my colleagues.

In today’s world, we are empowering people with more and more responsibilities, skills, better pay checks in the hope that this improves productivity at work, creates cutting edge products and keeps everyone happy and motivated. However, does it really work? Only, in the short term.
 
I have had many friends with the skills, motivation and opportunity to get a higher paying job. Yet, after a year or so when I checked in on them, they all shared something in common – they were all more frustrated. The fuel that was driving them was spent and they eventually jumped ship in the false hope of making a better life somewhere else. But the pattern repeated itself and they were all frustrated in a desperate attempt to find elusive happiness.  

Many enlightened individuals in our world today have realised this fallacy. Few of us have worked out that taking on lesser responsibilities leads an overall good quality of life at an acceptable pace and financial security. 

But then for most of us, this may not be an acceptable option. In an age where we have so many ambitions, never-ending deadlines and so many goals to fulfil before we kick the bucket, cutting down responsibilities seems counterproductive. It’s a hard decision.

What to do then? Well, welcome to the party called ‘I am eternally confused’! The good news is, you are not alone.

Many years ago figuring this out meant a trip to the Himalayas to find elusive inner peace. Not anymore. You can do what you want, be where you want to be, shoulder those responsibilities yet have that inner peace. In today’s age, it is called Mindfulness, I call it ‘Meditation’. 

The ancient art of meditation or practising mindfulness is far more relevant now due to our increasing responsibilities and pressures – we need more focus and energy to do our jobs efficiently, which results in stress and tension. 

Humans are not built of steel and so constant stress breaks us up. Prolonged stress often causes a systematic breakdown of relationships, health, job and so many things. You have seen it, read about it or experienced it – I will rest my case here.

So everything is rosy if you do not have much to do – which is why in ancient times, meditation was used as a perfect tool for higher awakenings. Today this still may be the case where you want a higher awakening but meditation is far more required if you have more responsibilities. 

This is why I brought it to our workplace, in an attempt to help my colleagues manage responsibilities and also if they have any stress, the opportunity to let it go, or tap into what’s going on inside.

Silence is the mother of all creativity. And you can only be silent when you can handle all your challenges effectively. Meditation enhances your abilities to face challenges. It harmonizes your thoughts, emotions and feelings to bring up a greater clarity of mind. It improves the way you perceive things and interact with the world that results in a perfect expression of yourself. Think about responding better than just reacting to situations or people around you. Get the drift?

The beauty of meditating regularly is that it keeps your body healthy and your mind alert without any cost to you. A side effect of mediating regularly is that you just know it – whether it will work or not, you just know it. Often called a ‘gut’ feeling’ it is basically ‘working intuition’.

There is a word in Sanskrit called as Yogakshemam. Yoga means to attain what you do not have. And kshemam means to protect what you already have. Mediation = Yogakshemam

Use it to acquire what you need but most importantly preserve what you already have. If you are content, healthy and happy you can use meditation to maintain that state.

I hope to have instilled this with my colleagues that have made it to the lunchtime sessions. So far people have shown a lot of enthusiasm and engagement. It has spurred some to restart their own daily mediation practice and made others feel ‘refreshed and invigorated’. This is exactly the purpose it is intended to serve. Namaste. 

Here’s how some have felt after the session:

Pooja, Automation Test Analyst
“Last yog nidra session I felt like I slept for eternity when only thirty minutes had passed”

Nicholas, Senior Business Analyst
“A++ refreshment, A++ reflection, A++ invigoration. Would session again!”

Tony, QA Team Lead
“I just wish these sessions were longer.”

Meghan, Communications Manager
“I also wish the sessions were longer, it is a great moment to take out of the day, I always feel refreshed getting back into work”

Leila, Senior Business Analyst
“Your sessions have made me restart my own meditation practise. Two years ago I used to do a session using the Headspace app every day, but then life got in the way. Since starting your sessions, I've resumed with Headspace and now meditate every single day.”

Cassie, Head of Software Development
“I employ visualisation techniques when I feel myself getting stressed. a quick 30 second breathing exercise and body scan can keep me calm.“